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Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Historical Spotlight: Marriage of Lady Jane Grey to Lord Guilford Dudley

The marriage of Lady Jane Grey to Lord Guilford Dudley was purely a strategic move by both sets of parents. John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, wanted to connect his family to the royal line by marrying his youngest son, Guilford, to the Duke of Suffolk's daughter, Jane. The Duke and Duchess of Suffolk had always wanted to elevate their family and putting Jane in line for the throne was the best way. The two were married in May of 1553.

The wedding was a triple wedding: Jane and Guilford, Katherine Grey (Jane's sister) and Lord Herbert, and Guilford's sister Katherine to Lord Hastings.

Jane and Guilford did not get along well. She is said to have described the consummation of their marriage as rape, as he was so forceful. Once Jane was Queen, she refused the attempts by the Duke of Northumberland to have Guilford crowned as King. She would only agree to have him named the Duke of Clarence.

When the Lady Mary was proclaimed Queen, Jane and Guilford were housed in the Tower until February 12, 1554. Queen Mary signed the death warrant for both of them for the reason of treason and both were beheaded.

Jane was buried in St. Peter ad Vincula between Queen Anne and Queen Katherine, who had both suffered the same fate.




Copyright © 2009 by The Maiden’s Court

3 comments:

  1. I did not know about the triple wedding! Great post:)

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  2. I didn't know about the triple wedding, either! (I read Innocent Traitor. If it was in there, I must have forgotten already. That means a re-read! yay!) Very interesting.

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  3. I guess they wanted to keep them all together. Not many queens got beheaded.

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